Posts Tagged With: Compensation

An Attitude of Gratitude

“The people are bringing too much for the work that the Lord has commanded us to perform!”

Exodus. 36.5 (Parashat Vayakhel-Pekude)

Have your ever been to a fundraising event where the person standing on the dais says, “OK. We’ve raised enough money tonight. You can all go home now!” Personally, I have never experienced this moment – and I never expect to do so. Furthermore, there is not one professional development specialist in North America who would ever confess to having raised enough money for his or her non-profit; there is never enough.

And there is a good reason for this – and it is not greed. While Moses’ chief designer Bezalel may have had a surplus of riches for the Tabernacle (and we can understand ordering twice as much tile as we need for a flooring project, for example), the major goal of fundraising is not just to reach a monetary target, it is to develop a spirit of giving. Any development specialist will prefer a smaller gift, given annually, than a large gift, given once. A regular, annual gift allows for the possibility of greater attachment to the organization and the possibility of larger gifts in the future. One big gift, no matter how generous, risks the chance of the donor just walking away without any future benefit. So, for example, I would rather receive a $100,000 gift spread out over 10 years than as a one-time donation. This gives me the chance to involve the donor in the activities of my organization and to increase the gift over time, perhaps even doubling it or extending the life of the donation for another 10 years to a $200,000 gift.

But an even more fundamental question must be asked: Why did the Israelites give so generously? It seems to me that Moses was a master fundraiser. He developed an “attitude of gratitude” among the people (not my phrase). People donate because they want to give; if not, it’s a tax or an expense. I have to pay the IRS and buy groceries; I don’t have to give money to,say, the Southern Poverty Law Center to fight bigotry in America (a worthy cause). But I met the founder of the SPLC years ago, believe in their cause and am grateful that they do the work that they do. So I donate to their organization. I do not believe in white power organizations, for example, so they don’t get my money!

It is important to remember that we can be leaders in non-profit and religious organizations just as we can be leaders in our businesses and families. But to do so, we have to cultivate an attitude of gratitude in those whom we purport to lead. It is much harder to do so because these organizations are voluntary; people choose to join us – and there is nothing that we can do to keep them from leaving us. And, just as important, we do not give them money to let us lead them; if anything, we take their money and hope that they follow us. And if they don’t like the direction of our group, they will either vote us out or just leave; we are truly their servants.

So when we lead non-profit and religious organizations, let us remember that we are truly the servants of those whom we lead. And when we endeavor to develop an attitude of gratitude among them, we will reach the point when the giving will overwhelm the need – but we will of course always find a greater need in order to cultivate greater gratitude – until the day when our cause will, with God’s grace, become irrelevant.

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